ghosthunt



memphis-milano:

The “Ashoka” lamp designed by Ettore Sottsass for Memphis 1981 inspired by Sottsass’ India travels.

memphis-milano:

The “Ashoka” lamp designed by Ettore Sottsass for Memphis 1981 inspired by Sottsass’ India travels.

evahesse:

Eva Hesse
No Title
1965-66

evahesse:

Eva Hesse

No Title

1965-66


Kathryn Andrews Tropic, 2011, wood, steel, mirror, paint, ink

Kathryn Andrews Tropic, 2011, wood, steel, mirror, paint, ink

curated-by:

Kathryn Andrews, Tot Finder (Spring Varietal), 2012

curated-by:

Kathryn Andrews, Tot Finder (Spring Varietal), 2012

skt4ng:

Kathryn Andrews
Senegal, 2011

skt4ng:

Kathryn Andrews
Senegal, 2011
mentaltimetraveller:

Kathryn Andrews, Museum Ludwig, Cologne

mentaltimetraveller:

Kathryn Andrews, Museum Ludwig, Cologne

koichialtair:

Mica Hand Hopewell, Ross County, Ohio (Mound 25) c. 100 BCE - 500 CE Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL, USA

koichialtair:

Mica Hand Hopewell, Ross County, Ohio (Mound 25) c. 100 BCE - 500 CE Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL, USA

(Source: killthecurator)

archaeoart:

Olmec head, La Venta, Mexico, circa 1940.

archaeoart:

Olmec head, La Venta, Mexico, circa 1940.

starry-eyed-wolfchild:

THE SERI INDIANS of Sonora Mexico 

Many cultural changes have taken place in the last few decades. Except for special events, women no longer paint their faces as they once did. Those who saw and recorded Seri face painting marked a dying trait.

Women painted delicate and tasteful designs on their faces. Usually, designs were carried in a straight horizontal line across the upper face and over the bridge of the nose. Elements represented flowers, leaves, and other pretty motifs and it was all done just to be attractive.

Married women used distinctive but heavier patterns that identified them as matrons.

Men also painted on occasion-to go to war, for spiritual protection, or just general attraction. Designs suggested by medicine men could be used by both sexes for spiritual protection.

(Source: uapress.arizona.edu)

theories-of:

Honza Zamojski, Father God; stone, steel, painted MDF, 262 x 46 x 46 cm 

theories-of:

Honza ZamojskiFather God; stone, steel, painted MDF, 262 x 46 x 46 cm